Uploaded 22-Feb-11
Taken 19-Feb-11
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Photo Info

Dimensions1200 x 1800
Original file size1.36 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken19-Feb-11 19:52
Date modified15-Oct-12 17:42
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeCanon
Camera modelCanon EOS 7D
Focal length16 mm
Exposure15s at f/2.8
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
ISO speedISO 3200
Orion, Taurus & Pleiades

Orion, Taurus & Pleiades

02.19.11
Canon 7D, 16-35mm (16mm) @ f/2.8
4 x 15 seconds @ 3200 ISO
Tripod mounted, no guiding
Manually stacked in Photoshop

Orion, sometimes subtitled The Hunter, is a prominentconstellation located on the celestial equator and visible throughout the world. It is one of the most conspicuous, and most recognizable constellations in the night sky. Its name refers to Orion, a hunter inGreek mythology. Its brightest stars are Beta (Rigel) and Alpha (Betelgeuse), a blue-white and red supergiant respectively. Many other of the brightest stars in the constellation are hot blue supergiant stars.


Taurus is one of the constellations of the zodiac, which means it is crossed by the plane of the ecliptic. Its name is a Latin word meaning "bull", and its astrological symbol is a stylized bull's head: (Unicode ♉). Taurus is a large and prominent constellation in the northern hemisphere's winter sky. It is one of the oldest constellations, dating back to at least the Early Bronze Age when it marked the location of the Sun during the spring equinox. Taurus came to symbolize the bull in the mythologies of Ancient Babylon, Egypt and Greece. There are a number of features of interest to astronomers. Taurus hosts two of the nearest open clusters to Earth, the Pleiades and the Hyades, both of which are visible to the naked eye. At first magnitude, the red giant Aldebaran is the brightest star in the constellation. In the northwest part of Taurus is the supernova remnant Messier 1, more commonly known as the Crab Nebula.


In astronomy, the Pleiades (pron.: /ˈpl.ədz/ or /ˈplədz/), or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation ofTaurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The name Pleiades comes from Greek mythology; it has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.
The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium that the stars are currently passing through. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighbourhood. (from Wikipedia)